Quotes and Statements

“The National Football League has been actively challenging the CRTC’s simultaneous substitution decision through the proper legal and policy channels since the regulator made its initial ruling 18 months ago. The CRTC’s legal maneuverings each step of the way have only served to delay this process in an apparent attempt to run out the clock and sidestep the challenge. While the NFL continues to preserve its legal rights and press its case in Canadian courts, the League remains confident that the Government of Canada will act reasonably and responsibly before the 2017 Super Bowl to address this arbitrary attempt by the CRTC to disadvantage not only the NFL, but Canadian broadcasters and the Canadian creative community as well.”
– NFL

“Simultaneous substitution of advertising messages from the U.S. with ad spots from Canada ensures three things. Firstly, that Canadian advertisers get as much opportunity to target their customers as possible. Secondly, it stops competitors in the U.S. getting Canadian marketing for free. Thirdly, it ensures that the Canadian broadcasters are able to monetize the property, ensuring they can invest back into quality content for Canadian viewers. The Super Bowl is one of the biggest television events of the year; for those Canadians who choose to view it on CBS, rather than CTV, to see U.S. ads and not Canadian spots, sets a worrying precedent that could have long-term implications for the health of the Canadian media economy. If the CRTC allows this to happen for one of the biggest events in the television calendar, then why not let it happen all of the time. This is the very real danger.”
– Neil Johnston, Chief Trading Officer, GroupM Canada

“Our industry is deeply concerned that one of the largest advertising platforms available to Canadian brands will be arbitrarily taken away from us in order to remedy a concern shared by a tiny fraction of Canadians who want to see American advertisements during CTV’s SUPER BOWL broadcast – ads that Canadians can easily access on YouTube prior to the actual broadcast. The fact that this particular decision singles out only the SUPER BOWL as the exception is as perplexing as it is troubling, and it creates significant uncertainty and lost opportunity for homegrown advertisers. We should be creating more opportunities for Canadian brands to reach more Canadians, not taking them away.”
– Michele Pauchuk, President, Canadian Media Directors’ Council (CMDC)

“With over 18 million Canadians having watched at least part of the game in 2016, the Super Bowl is one of the biggest televised means to reach this market. The sheer scope and considerable amount of viewers tuning in live make this a key event enabling Canadian marketers to reach consumers.”
– Nicolas Marin, President, Conseil des Directeurs Médias du Québec, CDMQ Superbowl support letter

“It’s random, arbitrary and pretty harmful,” said Jocelyn Moore, the NFL’s senior vice president of public policy and government affairs. “We’re just asking for a fair shake.”
– Jocelyn Moore, NFL Senior VP of Public Policy and Government Affairs
I4U News – Jan. 16

“unparalleled platform for Canadian firms and advertisers to speak to Canadians…it provides an unmatched opportunity for Canadian creators who depend on often scarce creative work an opportunity to not only work, but to be exposed to the largest TV broadcast audience of the year.”
– Jerry Dias, President of Unifor
The Wire Report (Online) – Jan. 12 (no link – Unifor asks for suspension of SimSub ban)

“The message is: Do the right thing and rescind it,” said Ron Lund, president of the Association of Canadian Advertisers. “Toying with a system without having something to replace the system with is very dangerous.”
– Ron Lund, President of the Association of Canadian Advertisers
Bloomberg – Jan. 9

“It would be one thing if this were a policy that were a broad policy that didn’t just apply to one entity, the NFL, and one broadcast, the Super Bowl”
– Jocelyn Moore, NFL Senior VP of Public Policy and Government Affairs
National Post – Jan. 4

The NFL said that while it “continues to preserve its legal rights and press its case in Canadian courts, the League remains confident that the Government of Canada will act reasonably and responsibly before the 2017 Super Bowl to address this arbitrary attempt by the CRTC to disadvantage not only the NFL, but Canadian broadcasters and the Canadian creative community as well.”
– NFL Official Statement
The Globe and Mail – Dec. 28

“Most Canadians don’t know that the Canadian ads they see during the Super Bowl mean work opportunities for Canadian performers. But they do,” said ACTRA National Executive Director Stephen Waddell. “The CRTC decision is incredibly short-sighted, reckless, and it puts creative sector jobs at risk.”
– Stephen Waddell,  ACTRA National Executive Director
Press Release – Dec. 21

“The NFL and its Canadian broadcast partner have a business relationship that is based upon the ability to sell Canadian ads in the Canadian market. Undermining this business relationship is not only unproductive, it also sends a troubling signal about the value Canada places on its largest trading partner, best customer, and close friend, For these reasons, we hope that upon review of the harmful precedence this order will set, Canada will reverse this policy.”
– S. Senator’s Marco Rubio and Ron Johnson
Joint Letter – Dec. 20

“There seems to be no real rationale for making this kind of a one-off decision,” Nault said in an interview Thursday. “This has a huge impact… Just one company — (CTV owner Bell Media) — is forecasting about a $40 million loss. This is serious. And what shocks me the most is the information we’re receiving is that this was all based on less than 100 people complaining that they couldn’t see the American commercials.”
– MP Bob Nault – Chair of Foreign Affairs Committee
The Canadian Press – Dec. 15 (Globe and Mail)

“This decision interferes in the contractual rights between a U.S. company and a Canadian company, severely reduces the value of NFL programming, and deprives the NFL’s Canadian licensee of a significant benefit that derives from its Super Bowl license – the ability to sell its own Super Bowl ads – a benefit that remains available for all content other than the Super Bowl.”
“the economic consequences will be significant.”
– David Thomson, NFL Canada Managing Director
Cartt.ca – Dec. 8

 “I hope that this issue can be resolved in a way that reflects and honours the benefits of the ongoing trade relationship between our two countries,”
– Ken Hyatt, U.S. Department of Commerce
The Canadian Press – Dec. 7 (Winnipeg Free Press)

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